Previous Lecture Complete and continue  

  How to Remind Employees of their Goals

Access the the rest of this Series:

"How to Improve Team Performance"


Course Transcript

How to Remind Employees of their Goals

We've talked about goal setting, now I want to talk about performance management. How do you not just give them goals, which are awesome, but you also give them the best chance for success. Setting goals is great, but not enough. We have to make sure they also have a good chance to succeed by setting up the right environment. Let me give you some ideas about how you can do that. The first one is, you can just remind them. That may seem silly, but we often don't remind them. Either because we think they have it, don't worry about it, leave them alone, or we think it's being a nudge by reminding them, so we have a problem.

It's very simple. You don't have to say, "How you doing on your goals? Where you going?" You don't have to do that, but you can bring up goals in regular meetings. Just say, "Hey guys, keep working on your goals. Hey guys, remember if you're having a problem, let me know." Those types of small nudges, very small, weekly meeting, monthly follow-up, catch-up, all good, can help tremendously in just keeping the goals on their minds. But there's more.

You can actually create a visual reminder. Meaning you can do something that's around the office that is on their computer, some visual reminder of their goals. Say their goal is to achieve a certain level of customer satisfaction. To achieve a certain number of new business. To make a certain number of phone calls in a given day, a week, or month. Whatever that is. You can use whatever they feel is an appropriate visual reminder. Note what I said. What they feel. Not what you think is right. What do they think is right? Do they want a number, do they want a picture? What makes them think about it and feel good about it?

Again, we want buy in from them. You seen this before. There's a rule on visual, because you've gone to a business and you've seen something like a, "Sales goals for the month," or something like that. You see how high they've gone, look at the date, it says January 2006. Yeah. It's way old, because they put it up there and they forgot about it. The issue with visual reminders is they become invisible. Eventually they will blend in to the rest of the world. If you're going to use visual reminders, I love them, please do so, but remember, they're going to become invisible.

I'm sure you've had it to where you put up that sticky on your computer, "Remember do so and so." Then before you know it, there's a sticky on top of that, and there's four sticky's there and nothing happens. It's invisible. Instead, remember, if you use visual reminders, change them often. How you change them, not that important. Change the color, change where it is. A minor shift in the environment to reinvigorate it again, one more time. Visual reminders are awesome, use what they think. If you don't know what they think, ask them. Say, "Hey guys.

I want to make sure we know that we're working on our goals. What do you guys think would be a good idea to put in the office somewhere? What do you think would be great to put up on the wall or by your computer or in your signature at the bottom of your email? What would work? Ask them. As long as it's not something crazy, agree. Put it up there and move forward. This way if they don't make their goals or they start to fail, again you say, "But guys you picked this." We're giving them buy in, giving them the idea of ownership of every aspect of what they have to achieve. Consider that.

The other thing you can do here is a type of internal branding. Letting people know who you are, what you are. You can now use things like your vision, your mission, your mandate, your core values and put them around the office. We see that also. Also, makes them realize it's more than just their day to day work, it is an overall goal over the course of a month, or a week, or a year, or a quarter. However, you're deciding on how you want to measure them, whatever that case may be. There's something else. If you know what will make them successful, meaning there are certain things they can do, certain routines they can do, X number of phone calls, certain types of reading, certain types of exercises they should be doing on a given day, week, or month.

Certain tasks that will always work on a daily basis, weekly basis, monthly basis. Tell them. Get them into routines. Ask them about routines. Get them into doing the same things that they want to each remember every week, or month, or year. This will help them in achieving their goals, make them think, "If I keep working through this, I'll get there."

Let me go one step further. Rewards. How are you going to incentivize? I hear this one all the time. "You've got to incentivize people to achieve their goals." What people always mean by that is give them money. Let me tell you that is a really bad idea. Generally speaking money by itself is a very poor motivator and not a very good way of getting better performance. If you look at all the best performance you will find money is one of the least reasons why someone actually does good performance. Money with something is a very good motivator. Money with promotion, money with accolades, money with responsibility, money with benefit or a bonus. Awesome. Money with, great. Money by itself, not so great.

What do I do to incentivize? How do I motivate people to do better? What if you have money or if you don't have money? What if you're in an environment where money's not going to happen or the reverse. You've got tons of it. You can give it out. You can give out bonuses as long as they're selling you can give out bonuses. What if you're in that environment, what do you do? I'm going to tell you in the next video.

Access the the rest of this Series:

"How to Improve Team Performance"